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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,133 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the united states house of representatives. the united states senate, the senate majority leader, the speaker of the house, the honorable edward brooke, and the president of the united states. [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, majority leader of the united states senate, the honorable harry reid. [applause] >> everyone, please be seated. november 6, 1962, was a special day for president john kennedy. it was a day his brother ted won his old seat in the united states senate. the seat he would hold for the next 46 years, until just two months ago. a seat from which he would greatly improve the lives of his fellow americans. but on that election night, president kennedy took particular notice of another result from that same ballot in massachusetts. the people of the president's home state had elected edward brooke to be its attorney general, making him the first african-american to hold statewide office in massachusetts and the first african-american to serve as any state's attorney general. president john kennedy exclaimed, and i quote, "that's the biggest ne
people, including ethnic and religious minority, whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> but even as the president called for access to information, china was tightly controllg it. the meeting with a carefully screened group of students who were coached beforehand was not broadcast live across the country, and while it was available on two big national internet sites, it was hard to hear. and one big website, the xinhua news agency told people that the obamauñ÷ live, but then on the screen apparently fails to deliver on that promise. in tonight's "lead focus," we take an in depth look at the obama visit and its significance, beginning with the presidents day from melissa chan of al jazeera english. >> reporter: the president is now in beijing, but earlier in the day, he was in shanghai for his town hall meeting. it's the favorite format for the american president, a conversation with the people, talking about u.s./china relations. >> our world is now fundamentally interconnected. the jobs we do, the prosperity we build, the environment we protect, the securit
who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states. but we do have one. that's pretty of cour pretty p obvious. we have taken too heightly danger of the propaganda in the united states and the extent to which the mosques in the united states can reinforce these attitudes. so it's something that requires a lot more effort on the part of the bureau. >> paul: what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young muslim american to go over to al-qaeda? i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode, because it seems that some of them were radicalized if that is the right word by the invasion by ethiopia of somalia in 2007 that the united states supported. can it be one event like that? >> yes. there are many factors that come into play and there has been excellent studies looking at islamic militants, particularly those in europe. and you do tend to esee a pattern. first, there tends to be something deeply personal that strikes that believer and it r radicalizes him and makes him believe that the muslim community at large, what is almost a virtual
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
and gentlemen, the president of the united states. >> ladies and gentlemen, please remain standing for the procession of our nation's colors and those of our veterans service organizations and the united states air force concert band plays the -- plays the "national emblem march". ♪ ♪ ♪ [the "national emblem march" playing] ♪ >> please remain standing for the prayer for all veterans delivered by chaplain keith etheridge, director of the department of veterans affairs chaplain service. >> please join me in prayer. eternal god, another year has passed and once again we get there before you in this sacred amphitheater to pray and honor american veterans. as we gather here, we see new faces of family members still grieving the loss of loved ones who have made the ultimate sacrifice for the cause of freedom. we pray for them and for all veterans and their families who gather in ceremonies large and small at this hour to honor the living and the dead who have served in our armed forces. we especially pray for our soldiers set fort hood and for their families -- bless our veterans
this was an utter, unmitigated disaster for the security of the united states and for the interest of the united states in the dangerous world we live in. the sanctimonious comments by general holder today are this, self-serving and self-centered. we ought to be concerned of what is in the interest of the united states of america. you nailed it absolutely right. what good is there to be gained by trying these mass murderers, war criminals in civilian courts with rules designed for conventional crimes committed by conventional criminals as general mukazie once said. they'll challenge the way they were treated and what about the chain of evidence and did we have all the constitutional nicities in a war? they're going to proclaim outrageous treatment and lie about it because they've got the world stage and this will serve to recruit additional jihaddists because they're going to attack america throughout this entire episode, the sorry episode and they're going to try and get support throughout the muslim world for their cause by ex-core eighting -- excoriating the united states of america and our v
is the united states refining its anti-piracy strategy. the coast guard is bringing apprehended pirates to justice. how to fend off attacks. commander shannon gilrees, chief of prevention log group. commander, welcome to the show. >> thank you, sir. >> so how is the united states refining its anti-piracy campaign. >> we'll continue to adapt to what the pirates are throwing at us as far as their techniques. we are working with the maritime industry to try to answer their questions about how we can help them address the problems in the region. we're also working with interagency -- agency by that i mean the department of defense, department of state, the maritime administration, other agencies -- >> the justice department as well? >> the justice department as well. we're working to refine that policy to adapt the policies the pirates are using. >> prosecuting captured pirates has been a challenge. you can't drop them off in somalia for trial, for example. what is going on in that front in terms of cooperation the united states is striking with other country in the region to bring these gu
and india and the rest of east asia and these companies can be located in the united states, europe, japan. anywhere. you got to look at it company by company to try to latch on to some of this growth we're seeing coming out of asia. >> let me talk about the united states, the market has soared about 60% since march. really which was the bottom, of course. now hitting 13 month highs this week alone. do you think there's still room to go up? if i wanted to enter this market, put new capital to work right now is that worthwhile or have i missed. >> it's >> you haven't missed it at all. what people don't realize is how much the market pell in point terms and between october 9th of 2007 and march 9th of 2009 the s&p 500 fell by 888 points. we still regained less than half of those points lost. so there's still more money on the table than we've gotten back so far. so i know people would have liked to have gotten in hard. even if they didn't there's still opportunity for good gains in stocks in the united states over the next few years. >> what about the large sort of structural issues the u.s.
is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that i
chance to mention just exactly what we do in the united states that t china. in the-- the minut& >> bill planning with the pres thank you very much. now here's maggie.-- >>> a drug. millions take zetia by merck, but renewing questions about whether it our dr. jennifer ashton is here with go y- this at length this morning b- becauecause so many people do take this this journ 200& for 14 months. som- others were taking an over the counter vitamin. wh >> had cardiovascular risk factors or t attack - they were already on a stat & - pconcont
that the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked. >> president obama is in asia threw next week with stops in tokyo, singapore, shanghai, beijing. so who get as the lion's share of obama's time? china. three days out of nine replicating what happened recently at the u.n. where the president of china and president obama were closeted for 90 minutes. this time allocation speaks for itself. and if there is any doubt remaining, obama's description of the u.s./chinese relationship clears it up. >> the relationship between the united states and china will shape the 21st century, which makes it as important bilateral relationship in the world. >> question. what must president obama accomplish in china this coming week? pat? >> he'll have to rebalance the trade relationship between the united states and china. the last ten years, the chinese have had a $2 trillion surplus. we've experted to them jobs, factories, money, technology, and that's one of the reasons why we've got this financial crisis and the dollar's in such trouble. what he's got to do is convince the chinese that this
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
moved back to the united states when i was a baby and lived there till i was five in rochester, new york. this was after it had become safe for war resisters. my father worked in a health clinic in the state, and my mother worked at a cable access channel. they both decided they preferred it in canada. my father preferred the single payer health care system. my father preferred that. my mother was working for the national film board, which is a public institution that allowed her to make the political films that she wanted to make. they left the u.s. because of stayed in canada because of the social programs. >> do you remember when you first learned of this story and it sunk in? >> in canada, you did not have to be rich to get sick. i feel i always knew the story about health care. this was explained to me as a kid. i did understand that it was unfair that people were denied access to medicine because they did not have money to pay. as a doctor, my father preferred to work in a system whereby money did not have anything to do with the care that you received. i feel like i have always k
. one country's success need not co at the expense of another. that is why the united states insists we do not seek to contn china's rise. on the contrary, we welcome ina as a stron and prosperous and sucssful member o the community of nations. >> reporter: answering a qution on internet access ina -- >> unrestcted internet access a source ofrength, and i thinshould be encouraged. i think that the morereely formation flows, the stronger the society beces because tn citizens of countries around the world can hold their own governmes accountable. ey can begin tohink for themselves that generates new ideas. >> reporter: and disssing cooperation on climate change -- >> the united stat and china are th world's two larst emitters of greenhous ges, of carbon that is causing the planet to warm. so unls both of ou countries are willg to take critical steps in dealing with this issue, we wil not be able to resolve it. >> reporter: there's no down china d the u.s. wil be v to workogether on a variety of world problems, but don't expect any major announcements fro this visit. after shangi, the pres
, the answer is i would probably start with something different from what we have in the united states. there is a wonderful book out there called "the healing of america," by a washington post reporter. what we have in the united states is an amalgam of the worst, that just about all of the system that you talked about, we have a little bit from this one, a little bit bad from this one, etc. so you end up with something that cims it is the best health care in the world when the statistics say it is pretty pathetic, the quality of health care and united states. >> you are saying the medicine is pathetic, so what about care? >> the medicine is pathetic, the results are pathetic. and the costs are exorbitant. >> that is very depressing. >> what happens then is that it gets demagogued to death. that is what we're seeing right now. the old things that scare people into tea parties, and from the left, things that are unrealistic. you end up in the same state of political paralysis, and the united states gets into deeper trouble providing something that should be a fundamental right in this
, john, because i don't think it will get through the united states senate. there's a reason for that, john. al gore's moment has come and gone. the truth is, they are changing the nile to climate change rather than global warming for a reason. for ten years, the earth has been cooling. 1998 or so was the hottest year. the polar bear population is doing fine. antarctica is growing, the ice cap is growing. the arctic ice cap has stopped shrinking. you look around the united states, you are having record cold trends. you have this tremendous real problem in the american economy as opposed toed mythical problem of global warming. for these reasons, john, i think it's not going to get through the senate. i think, as i say, al gore's moment has passed. this whole thing was a bit of a hoax designed to transfer power from individuals and wealth to governments and from governments to transnational, international corporations, global institutions. that time has come, and it has gone. >> eleanor? >> that was both a minority view and paranormic view that it's all a conspiracy to transfer power.
's meetg, "the new york tis" noted e range of issues on whic the united state was asking for china's help. somethinthat might have been thinkable, it sa,efore the united states became embroiled in two wars a bfore the u. onomy was hbbled bythe global financialrisis that began on ishores. those issu inclu the wde trade ga between the two countries, redung greenhouse gas emiions, as well as iran and its nuclear program. prident obama alsobrgh up with the dai lama,he a exiled leader of tibet. beyond a show of goodill and a prome to work o big issues, no breakthrous were reported. but in tonight's "leadfocus," we wt to show you how the issue was cvered by theenglish language cnnel of chinese ate television. >> reporter: presint hu jintao has met with barack obama in beijing. they haveledged fortronger cooperion and to findore mm ground deite their differces. their discusons also focused on global challengesndhe wod economy has a solid recove. >> ts is the third formal meetingetween pesident ji andao barack obama this year th the interests of e world'sargesteveloping and develed nations. the t
how the united states may change this influence, address this national security deficiencies him and provide global leadership in an era when the american economy may not be the overwhelming source of power it once was. increasingly, national influence will be determined by whether the countries can contribute to solving global problems or at lease whether they are making themselves indispensable to other nations. china and other developing economies are demanding a greater say in the management of the world economy through the g20 and other mechanisms. china's global leverage has increased as it liberally positioned itself as a creditor nation with more than 20% of the world current account balance surplus. we cannot depend invasively on china investing heavily in the united states government that. some thought must be given to how we work with china and other nations to establish a more sensible global balance that depends less on demand by american consumers. the united states in the g20 also must rethink the role of the international financial institutions that provide crisis
of the international community but fully engage with the international community and the united states is the one who can do the heavy lifting. there is no question about that. >> rose: and john harris of politiceau.com gives us a one-year analysis of the oa administration. >> the idea that president obama and his team were able to somehow transform the map and transform the political geography of this country or the political demography of this country, that just doesn't look to be the case. they did redraw the map in 2008. it was an he norly impressive victory. but that doesn't mean that they have somehow fundamentally altered the landscape in permanent ways. >> and job grisham is here with a new book, a collection of short stories. >> it is more about people. more about the small town people. many of whom are struggling. many of whom have had a lot of miss erie, a lot of hope. it's about small town lawyers and the crazy things they do out of desperation. all stuff i saw firsthand many years ago. >> rose: mohamed elbaradei, john harris, john grisham next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provid
of the world's challenges cannot be solved unless the united states and china work together rts. >> reporter: but there was another challenge, how to address china's record on human rights. the president broached the topic at a town hall meeting with university students in shanghai earlier in the day. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation. but we also don't believe that the principless that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms of expression and worship, of access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights. they should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> reporter: following past practice for such events chinese authorities detained dozens of human rights activists in advance of the president's visit. mr. obama did not mention the crackdown but he did chide the chinese government for internet censorship. china has 250 million internet users but also employs the world's tightest controls over web access. >> i am a
important to the united states? >>> india is going to be central to what we want to do in the world. >>> also, a disturbing new trend. police say they can't keep track of all of the registered sex offenders. there are just too many to keep an eye on. the internet provides easy prey. how can you keep your family safe? >>> good evening, and thanks for joining us. at this hour, we're waiting for the prime minister of india, manmohan singh, to arrive at the white house. president obama and the first lady will pay invitation to the first dinner. the list includes hollywood stars and business chiefs. 320 people will gather under a white house tent in the south lawn. singer jennifer hudson will headline the event. the symphony orchestra and the marine band will also perform. earlier today, president obama met with the indian prime minister and called them natural allies. topping the topics, global warming and trade. president obama has promised to visit india next year. >>> now to president obama's big decision on the war in afghanistan. the president said today he plans on finishing the j
of the pope. the religion spread to russia, greece, eastern europe and more recently to the united states. today orthodoxy remains one of the most popular form of christianity. his all holiness was born in 1940 on the turkish island of'm bruce. his father was a barbershop owner. he enrolled in a theological school graduating with high honors in 1961. on october 22, 1991, he was elected the 270th archbishop of constantinople. he was enthroned in the patriarchal cathedral in istanbul. from the beginning he has been on a mission to modernize the church and make it more relevant. early on, he became identified with environmentalism by incorporating yet into his spiritual message, he has preached in the spirit of dialogue and understanding among all religions. while there are chrez yas cal differences with the catholic church, he has met with the pope several times. he had several meets with john paul in the 1990s and met with benedict in turkey. he's met with leaders around the world, including fidel castro and moammar qaddafi. his holeryness is well known in america having received the congr
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
years between iran and the united states in geneva last month. he is now involved in the draft agreement between iran, the united states, russia and france to process iran's uranium stockpiles outside the country. there are reports today that progress on the deal is being held up by iran's ongoing internal political crisis. this week dr. elbaradei called the current mont a unique and fleeting opportunity to reverse course from confrontation to cooperation with iran. we want to talk about all of that and i am very pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> charlie, it is great to be here again. >> rose: all right. let me just start. tell me where you think the moment is. >> well, the moment is a historic critical moment, charlie, that this is for the first time i see a genuine desire by the president of the united states and by the iranian leadership to engage in a genuine dialogue. it's after 50 years of animosity, of distrust. and that's why we have this difficulty today. the it is a symbolic gesture but it could be the first step in a broad dialogue that eventually could integ
, they said, take care of yourself to get reelected. >> the opposite of a democrat in the united states, the difference is a conservative, not a republican. you cannot be -- a republican if you are not against big spending. >> keep thinking that. >> here is what i would say. what i would say is, look at virginia. bob macdonald reached over, not by moderating his principles, but by saying that his principles were not only good for saying, no. he says he wants to grow the economy, but he just wants us to do it, not washington. there is a positive, republican agenda out there. we will see more of that in 2010. >> when i first opted to propose the question, this was slightly more off-base. i want to bring up the idea. i came down here from boston, where republican was a dirty word. not because of the belief system but the reputation. my question is how much opinion is placed in the word, republican or democrat. and how much is in the ideology. how much will this affect things over the last year? how much has that changed? >> it is an interesting attachment to the word republican, as there i
and come to the united states and harm us physically or our nato allies or others. that's our quest. now can that quest be coupled with the ideas for nato -- schools, building a police force that is not corrupt, but also is efficient, and to do this in a country in which the literacy rate is so low, the poverty is so endemocratic. the whole traditions of dealing with money as to who your friends were is really so much a part of just existing. i think for the moment, the president from press accounts is looking at it province by province. he's looking at being in the medium-sized cities as well as the hamlets in the country. how does this match up with what we are doing with a line drawn by europeans a long time ago to divide the countries? do we understand the poshtoon culture? well, yes and no, and we're all learning fast, including the president, but i think we are learning. if the president does come forward with a plan or plans, he must make that very specific. and that is a very big quest. it will not do to have a tentative feeling that now you see if, now you don't, and this is amo
they could actually make a difference with the ballot. >> the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the problem of our continuing confrontation with the muslim world it has undermined the success of president after president. and we cannot continue that way. we have to find a way to overcome that barrier and therefore israel has to see itself in the context of the whole western alliance. >> rose: friedman, rogan, cohen next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provided by the following. >> each day a billion people won't find safe drinking water. around the world we're helping communitites to access clean water. working to improve lives through conservation and education. one drop at a time. >> additional funding for charlie rose was also provided by these funders. . >> and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this was a big week in diplomacy for president oa. last night he returned from a week long visit to asia it took him to j
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
. . every industrialized country has that system except the united states. we are going to change that. national polls show that the majority of doctors and the majority of americans favor a single payer system. that is why six months ago, we went to capitol hill. when senator baucus opened that first day of hearing in may, i stood up and said, excuse me, sir, why have you taken single payer off the table? why have you not allowed one doctor testify for single payer? baucus ordered us arrested. one by one, margaret, kevin, carol, and four others stood up and confronted baucus. and one by one we were all arrested and charged with disruption of congress. in a plea deal earlier this year, we agreed not to disrupt congress throughout the end of this year. since that day in may, baucus and harry reid in the senate, and nancy pelosi and steny hoyer in the house have cobbled together incomprehensible legislation. it is convoluted and confusing. but one thing is clear -- president obama and the democrats have cut a dirty deal with the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. obama took
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
service is enshrined in the constitution of the united states. we have a law that says the postal service should produce universal service. we have to maintain a basic service. host: joseph, independent caller. caller: one of the previous callers mentioned at the topic -- the vending machines. i look forward to going to the post office now with dread. one local post office has a giant hole in the wall covered with plywood where the vending machines used to be. when i asked one of the minister why they were gone. she said it was cost control. there's no way it can be more efficient to have all those people waiting in line. it makes no sense to me. there's something seriously wrong with the reasoning behind this kind of decision. i have seen it across the board. they're using space in the post offices for selling packages that have teddy bears and balloons on them. they should be sticking to basics, common-sense service. if i can avoid going to the post office, i will do it. they might as well -- it is just a nightmare. it is a baffling ordeal. guest: i am sorry to your use say that. you ar
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,133 (some duplicates have been removed)

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